History 

       

Volume:

  1. Brackett Cavalry Regiment
  2. Czechs were in on the ground floor
  3. Adjutant General's Report
  4. Col Albert Gallatin Brackett
  5. Czech National Cemetery in Chicago
  6. Dennis C. Schurr Collection - very interesting documents
 

 

Brackett Cavalry Regiment, Western Cavalry

 

 

Czechs were in on the ground floor

In the 9th cavalry regiment served also Czechs. Namely Vojtech G. Pinter , Jakub Kakuska and Mathias Skoblik. The first two are mentioned in the book of Josef Cermak - The Civil War history including experience of Czech soldiers.

Many countrymen fought in this war under different regiments. As Cermak wrote - it is evident from all, that American Czechs despite their humble count have sent considerable number of their sons out to the fight, thereby presented their clearest proof, that also them, citizens of this free republic, performed their duty and American nation will be always grateful to them. Keep these soldiers in honourable memory! 

 

 
 
The only known discrepancy is between this book, where Pinter and Kakuska belong to Company C, and the general roster of the regiment. As you can investigate at our links, they are there listed in Company I.

 

Vojtech G. Pinter

Vojtech G.Pinter was born on October 29, 1841 in Vodňany No. 116. Father Georg Pinter, occupation farmer. Mother Maria (Krejčí, daughter of Ján Krejčí), occupation shepherd. His wife was Maria (Matějčková).

 

Frame 125, 3rd line; a book born from 1825 to 1855, Vodnany, Strakonice. Trebon SOA

Adalbert Pienter born 29.10.1841, baptized 30.10. ...
Father: Georg Pienter, farmer.
Mother: Maria, legitimate daughter of Johann Kreyca, village blacksmith in Barony of Radomilice and his wife Maria, maiden name Mati..., from Radomilice - period map here.

 

Vojtech enlisted 3rd October 1864 to 9th regiment of the Illinois cavalry. He was born in Vodnany (Austrian empire), at Chicago he arrived in 1854. Pinter took part in countless battles and suffered from all the war distress. After the war ended he returned to his parents to Lockport, but died shortly after having developed dangerous illness during the war. He left no detailed information about him. (Cermak, page 401)
 In the Company I you can find this our fellow-countryman under the name Albert G. PAINTER.

 
 
 

Jakub Kakuska

 

The second Czech was Jakub Kakuska in most of available documents named Jacob KASHKUSHKA. Formerly we knew about this Czech native only from the short-spoken paragraph found in the mentioned book from Josef Cermak (page 413):
"With the 9th regiment of the Illinois cavalry (Company C); enlisted voluntarily 3rd October 1864 and served till end of the war; discharged with honour 13th October 1865. Settled in Chicago later."; And this was all until recently.

Record from a parish register in Netolice; the records are partially unreadable:

,,Jakub Kakuška, Podeřiště No. 17, born 25.4.1845, baptized 26.4.
Father: Bartholomäus Kakusska, unpropertied tenant, farm-hand and herdsman, son of Laurentz Kakusska..... village herdsman in ..... Hluboká nad Vltavou, mother Katharina, maiden name Wizrálková ... from Sedlec u Netolic
Mother: Theresia, daughter of Josef Kašpar, village herdsman k.... and Theresia was born in Moravec no. 6 near Velké Meziříčí.

 

His parents Bartolomej and Terezie were married 1837 in Hlavatec near Netolice (south from Pisek and northwest from Ceske Budejovice). They were poor peasants and much like his ancestors Bartolomej was local shepherd. By the parish register Jakub was born 25th April 1845 in Poderiste No.17 by Netolice (close to Vodnany, where Vojtech G.Pinter came from).

 

Here is a historic map of Poderiste. House number 17 is circled.

(Note: renumbering has been renumbered in the 1960s, so you can now see the 17th place in another place.)

 

After suppression of the revolution in 1848 many Czechs left to America. This family was also among these. They came to Chicago between 1852 and 1853. We have got a memoir saying, that Bartolomej was first Czech, who built a house in Chicago a one-room wooden house near Lake Michigan, in 1854 (quote Rudolf Bubeníček's book, 'Dějiny Čechů v Chicagu') and the mother of jakub Terezie was first Czech midwife in this location.

Jakub and some of his friends and also with his expectant brother in love Mathias Skoblik enlisted to 9th Illinois in Camp Douglas, which spreaded out on the shore of Lake Michigan at 39th street (where later Confederate prisoners were held and many died from hypothermia). It happened 3 October 1864 at his age 19 years. He served till 13th October 1865 (by military records). Then he stayed at South for five months later after the Confederacy has surrendered. The regiment was temporarily kept there to keep order and to enforce the emancipation of former slaves.

It is worth to mention also brief military information about Jakub Kakuska:
•rank: private
•age: 19
•eyes: grey
•hair: dark
•occupation: carpenter
•complexion: dark 

after the war, 14th July 1866 he married Marie Skoblikova (born 5th January 1846 in Luznice, Kaplice 1, Pohorska Ves, daughter of Vladimir Skoblik) in Catholic church of St. Family, 1019 S May Street (he lived at 413 West 12th Street), Chicago, Cook. They were married by father Damen. They lived at No. 412 West Eigteenth street, Chicago, district: East Pilsen.

In course of next years he had several occupations like constable and petty politician. Later he worked as engineer in the Simon Powell & Sons Distillery (South Canal Port Avenue a South Morgan Street, Garden City ). At this place he met his fate - died from fire and explosion 15th October 1880. Jakub is buried at Czech Naional Cemetery (555 Pulaski St, Chicago, Cook, Illinois). Here is shown his gravestone.

 

 

 

They had 8 children, namely:
1.Mary J. Kakuska, born Feb 1867, Chicago, Cook County, Illinois, + cca 1958.
2.Anastasia Kakuska, born cca 1868, Chicago, Cook County, Illinois, + unknown.
3.Frank Kakuska, born in Dec 1869, Chicago, Cook County, Illinois, + unknown.
4.Leopold Kakuska, born cca 1873, Chicago, Cook County, Illinois, + cca 1873, Chicago, Cook, Illinois.
5.Regina Victoria Kakuska, born  17th Jul 1877, Chicago, Cook County, Illinois, + 17th Jul 1954, 2705 S Cuyler Avenue, Berwyn, Illinois.
6.Agnes Kakuska, born 1878 (another resource shows 1875), + cca 1945.
7.Rose Matilda Kakuska, born  27th Jul 1879, Chicago, Cook County, Illinois, + 11th Mar 1970, Elmhurst, Illinois.
8.Caroline Isabella Kakuska, born  18 Mar 1881, Chicago, Cook County, Illinois, + unknown.

His widow after his death gave birth to daughter Caroline Isabella Kakuska 18th Mar 1881. She had married again in 1889. Till her death she lived in Chicago, Cook county. She died 5th June 1894 and she is also buried at the Czech Naional Cemetery .

 
 
During the Memorial Battle for Three South Bohemia, on April 28, 2018, a commemorative plaque in Podeřiště No. 8 was unveiled - the first commemorative plaque in the Czech Republic dedicated to a soldier from the American Civil War.
 
Text of the memorial plaque in English:
,,JAKUB KAKUSKA
Born April 25, 1845                          Died October 15, 1880
Born in no longer existing farm-hands’ cottage No.17,to the right of this farm.
 
In years 1864-65 fought in American Civil Warin ranks of 9th cavalry of USA.
 
In the memory devoted bythe military history club
9th Illinois Cavalry Regiment, Company I"
 
 
 
 

Mathias Skoblik


(we don't have a photo or a drawing)
 
1st sgt. Duffy found a third Czech from the regiment
born 21 Januaryy 1842, died 1884


Mathias Skoblik son of Vladimir Skoblik and brother of Marie Skoblikova was born 21 Jan 1842 in Luznice, Kaplice 1, Pohorska Ves and died in year 1884 in Le Sueur, state Minnesota.

It is not known when exactly the whole Skoblik family (Alzbeta, Martin, Matyas and Marie) came to America, particularly to Chicago. It is highly probable it happened at the same time, may be jointly, with Kakuska family. 
By military records had Matyas Skoblik enlisted 1 October 1864 (two days before his fellow and latter brother-in-law Jakub Kakuska) in Chicago and served until 13 October 1865.

Military archives estreat - http://civilwar.illinoisgenweb.org/acm/cav009-i.html

SKOBLIK, Matthias Recruit Chicago Oct 1, 1864 Mustered out Oct 13, 1865

After the war his son John Scoblik was born 24 June 1866 (died 30 July 1958 state Minnesota).
He has got maried with Marie Samackova 26 October 1869 in Le Sueur (Minnesota).
Died in 24 July 1884 at the same place.

More details - scoblic.net:

  • He was cutting sugar maple trees in LeCenter, MN area when one fell against another. In trying to free it, it fell and killed him. His estate was probated July 24, 1884. Matthias enlisted for one year in Co I, 9th Regiment, Illinois Cavalry on Oct 1, 1864 in Chicago. The enlisting officer was Capt. Wm. James. Matthias was described as having blue eyes, dark hair, and dark complexion and stood 5 feet 4 1/2 inches high. He served in Springfield, Il, 2d Squadron in
  • Memphis, TN and was mustered out of the detachment Sep 30, 1865 in Montgomery, AL and out of the Company in Selma, AL on Oct 6, 1865. It appears his pay was $100 for a years service. He was a private when he entered at age 22 and a private when he was discharged. His enlistment record shows his birth place as Germany, his occupation as laborer, and his name, Mathias. He signed the documents Matej Skoblik. This information is from records of the 9th Illinois in the National Archives.


We've also found his grandkids and grand-grandkids.

 

 

 

Adjutant General's Report

 

 

   

 

Col. Albert Gallatin Brackett 

As already mentioned, cpl.Dandy has found one perfect photo of Col. Brackett at one auction (see the title photo in sub-menu of this section), but he also found the grave site of the Colonel - founder of 9th Illinois Cavalry Regiment. Thanks to this we know at least basic data. It is a quite strange, that the Illinois State Archive was unable to provide such information. So after one year from finding of our first photo of Col. Brackett ever by pvt. Guma, we have got next piece to the puzzle of history.

Born: 14th February 1829 in Cherry Valley, Otsego County, New York.

Died: 25th June 1896 in Washington, Columbia.

Buried 25th June 1896 in Arlington National Cemetery, Arlington, state Virginia.

Retired in rank of United States Army Colonel

He took a part in Indian Wars of 1855 - 1861 and 1868 - 1879.

Wife: Rose McHenry Brackett (her birthdate is missing – died 8th January 1912).

Source: Find A Grave, Records of Living Officers of the United States Army (1884), Fort Davis (Texas) - www-article, Arlington National Cemetery (ANC) webpage.

 

Description of grave location:

Arlington National Cemetery

Arlington County

Virginia, USA

location: Section SSIDE, No. 1052

 

The National Tribune, 2 Jul 1896, Thu, First Edition

 

 

Czech National Cemetery in Chicago

 

In the year 1877 the Czech National Cemetery was found in Chicago and then in the year 1892 the monument dedicated to Czech soldiers involved in American Civil War was erected.  

 

 

   

 

   

 

   

 

   

 

   

 

 

   

 

The cornerstone of The Civil War Monument, originally called the Bohemian Soldiers' and Sailors' Monument, was laid on July 28, 1899 and dedicated on May 29, 1892. Designed by artist, Joseph Klir, the bronze statue represents a private soldier in full fatigue uniform, holding a flag in his left hand and a musket with bayonet in his right. The base inscription is "PRO NOVOU VLAST” - for the new country. The memorial cost was $5,035.

   

 

 

Gatehouse

 

Gatehouse - rear view

 

 

Dennis C. Schurr Collection - very interesting documents

 

Duffy, I thank you and your friends for preserving the history of the 9th Illinois Cavalry Regiment in the Czech Republic. My 2nd great-grandfather was John G. Schurr and lived in Coral, Illinois and was a carpenter by trade. He served in Company C. under the command of Captain Smith A. Davison. John was demobilized on 31 October 1865 with the regiment in Selma, Alabama, where they had been ordered to board the trains to Springfield, Illinois for final termination of service. On November 10, 1865 the cars arrived and the soldiers were immediately assigned to Camp Butler. After eight days they were paid by the Paymaster General and finally mustered out of service. John departed for his long journey home, but died of pneumonia along his way, never to see his wife and newborn son. Captain Smith A. Davison later testified in behalf of my 2nd great-grandmother to help her win her war pension. I have included two images of Smith A. Davison. You can use any of the attachments from my collection for your website. I am also sending you two rare pictures of Colonel Albert G. Brackett standing dressed in his frock coat and Lieutenant colonel S. A. Paddeck wearing his cavalry sash and saber.     

 

     

Captain Smith A. Davison Company C

Commanding Pvt. John G. Schurr (2nd great-grandfather of Dennis C. Schurr)

 

 

   

Col. Albert G. Brackett and LtCol. S. A. Paddeck

 

   

Both pictures were taken by J. Carbuttem from Chicago.

 

This collection contains images, payroll receipts, commemorative ribbons, programs, badges and so on. "

So please check very rare documents. We are honored to present it here.

      

Lieut. William E. Bayley, Company L                          &                    1st Lieutenant Othman Ali Abbott Co. I

 

     

General Datus E. Coon                          &                    Lieut. John T. Showalter Company B

 

      

Lieutenant Colonel, Hiram F. Sickles                         &                    Brevet Brigadier General Hiram F. Sickles

 

     

Lt. Col. Harry B. Burgh                                         &                             Lt. Col. Anthony R. Mock

 

 

    

Captain Smith A. Davison  Company C                                    &                           Commanding Officers

 

     

Ransom Harrington Company B - Date of Muster Sep 19, 1861 in rank 2nd Lt. , Promoted 1st Lt. Sep 25, 1861, Promoted Capt. Jan 16, 1863

 

   

Clara Harrington, daughter Ransom Harrington, Company B    &     Captain Samuel Purviance, Company E

 

 

    

Lieutenant Chas. L. Pullam Company F                          &                  Captain John H. Carpenter Company L

 

   

Major Atherton Clark - Company K

 

   

 Copy of Cavalry Tactics Part 1 - That was used by Captain Atherton Clark, Co K

 

Captain Harrison C. Vore, Company G

 

    

Sergant Major George A. Price

 

    

Sergeant Major P.V. Fitzpatrick                                &                                Sergeant Hiram A. Hawkins Company D

 

   

Sergeant Charles C. White Company D                        &                       Sergeant Charles D. Manning Company I

 

   

Sergeant Samuel Morrow - Company B

 

   

Thomas W. Eaton - Company E.                                &                                     B.F. Prive - Company M

   

 

Private Nicholas Schmitt, Company E                       &                     Private Harry A. Bigelow Company M

 

   

Private Albert Sedgley - Company B        &        William R. Wilder Company F - promoted Bugler

 

    

 Surgeon Charles Brackett - brother, Col. Albert Gallatin Brackett        &     Ass't Surgeon Stacy Hemengway

                                                                                        

 

   

Surgeon George B. Christy                             &                         Jessee Hawes, M.D., Greeley,Col.

 

   

unidentified officers

 

   

unidentified officers

 

   

Edward A. Davenport, Company C - September 19, 1861 entered into the regiment as Quartermaster sergeant, later commissioned 1st lieutenant, April 8, 1863

Information from Dennis C. Schurr:


,,Twenty years after being mustered out, the regiment had it's 1st Reunion in Chicago, September, 28th & 30th, 1886. Two very important issues were discussed, the first being a design for their veterans badge. Since they carried Sharp carbines and were in the 16th Corp, it was decided to combine the two. The second was to consider publishing a regimental history. The first moved very quickly and were made available before the second reunion. (See attachments) At the 2nd Reunion, again it was brought up to write and publish a regimental history. After much discussion a History Committee was formed, nominating Lieutenant Edward A. Davenport as Historian. The committee, first were going to contact one of the veterans that had written a history to review it and get his approval to use and publish before the next reunion, however they were un able to make contact after many attempts. Edward A. Davenport suggested that they start from scratch, additional members were added to the committee. Mailing request were sent out immediately to the members asking them for stories and images. This project became a labor of love for the committee and was completed prior to their next reunion in 1888."

   

 

Pay voucher for Col. A. G. Brackett 9th Illinois Cavalry

 

 

   

In Memorial Hall

 

 

An Advance of the Cavalry Skirmish Line - artist Forbes

 

 

Veteran ribbons

 

1st Reunion Ribbon - Chicago, Sep. 28th & 30th, 1886

 

   

 

2nd Reunion Ribbon - Rock Island, Sep. 21st & 22nd, 1887

 

3rd Reunion Ribbon - Chicago, Sept. 19th & 20th, 1888

 

7th Reunion Ribbon - Chicago, Oct. 21st & 22nd, 1892

 

9th Reunion Ribbon Chicago, Sept. 20th & 21nd, 1894

 

10th Reunion Ribbon - Cambridge,  Illinois, Sept. 4th & 5th, 1895

 

12th Reunion Ribbon - Chicago, Sept. 21st & 22nd, 1897

 

13th Reunion Ribbon-Chicago, September 13th & 14th 1898.

 

14th Reunion Ribbon - Kewanee, Sept. 20th & 21st, 1899

 

15th Reunion Ribbon - Chicago, Aug. 30th & 31st, 1900

 

16th Reunion Ribbon - Chicago, Oct, 15th & 16th, 1902

 

15th & 16th Reunion Program in 1900 and 1902 Year

 

19th Reunion Ribbon - Chicago, Sept, 26th & 27th, 1905

 

23rd Reunion Ribbon - Chicago, Sept, 21st & 22rd, 1909

 

25th Reunion Ribbon - Chicago, Sept, 19th & 20th, 1911

 

26th Reunion Ribbon - Chicago, Sept, 17th & 18th, 1912

 

 

Grand Army of the Republic in Illinois

The Grand Army of the Republic or GAR was formed in Decatur, Illinois shortly after the Civil War. by Benjamin F. Stephenson. It was the largest organization of Union veterans of the Civil War The organization promoted comradeship among veterans, worked to increase pensions and assist war widows and orphans, and maintained homes for old soldiers.

In 1868, the commander in chief of the GAR and Civil War General John Alexander Logan inaugurated the observance of Memorial Day to honor fallen soldiers. Membership in the staunchly Republican organization peaked at more than 409,000 in 1890. The last member died in 1955, and the GAR was discontinued in 1956.

 

  

Uniform Henry H. Brown, Company C

 

   

 

   

 

   

 

   

 

   

 

 

Civil War  Magic Lantern Slide collection

Another part of the collection focuses on drawing scenes from battles

 

   

Army of the Potomac- 6th PA Cavalry-Rushs Lancers last attack at Gaines Mill & 

Brilliant Charge of U. S. Cavalry through the Village Fairfax Court House

 

   

Cavalry Collecting Forage Outside Lines in Virginia-2

& Cavalry Collecting Forage Outside Lines in Virginia-1

 

   

Gap in the Shenandoah Valley. Battle of Cedar Creek. A Charge of the Union Cavalry

& Gen. Sheridan's Last Charge at Winchester

 

   

Charge of Gen. Fremont's Body Guard through the town of Springfield, Mo. Oct. 24, 1861

& Sheridan's Final Charge at Winchester-2

 

   

Sheridan's Ride at Cedar Creek

& The Rebel Raid Into Pennsylvania- Stuart's Cavalry on Their Way to the Potomac.- Sketched Near Poolesville, Maryland, by MR. A. R. WAUD

 

   

Ukn Title

& Wounded Officer Commands Troops

 

   

 1st and 2nd Cherokee Mounted Rifles Scalping  Col. Trimble’s Cavalryman at the Battle of Pea Ridge   &     Mounted cavalry riding past reviewing stand during the grand review of the Union Army, Washington, D.C.

 

 

Sword presentation to Colonel Burgh 

 

In the early days of the regiment it was quite custom of friends, and also members of the different companies to make presentations of dress swords, etc., to the officers of the regiment, and this was well enough seemly as an expression of the esteem in which these officers were held by their friends.

Soon after Company A. arrived in camp it was proposed by some comrades that the members of the company to show their appreciation of what Captain H. B. Burgh had done for them and the confidence and esteem in which he was held, to present him in behalf of the company a dress sword, and for this purpose one hundred dollars had been subscribed by the members of Company A. By some means the Captain learned of this movement, and not thinking the proper thing at this time, he called his company together, and stated to them that he had learned of their intention and that while he appreciated, he must discourage their carrying it out, and requested the return the money back to the donors, at the same time giving as his reasons “That he was yet untried, and they did not know but in the actual contact with the enemy he might run away or even at the present time grow faint hearted, and thus bring disgrace upon the sword they proposed to present.” Stating further, that it was his judgement that a presentation of any kind should not be made until a soldier had by his acts shown himself to be worthy of the same.

The members of Company A, deference to their captain’s wishes, abandoned the presentation at that time, but it seems that they did not forget their desire. The years of the war passed on, Captain Burgh became Major and Lieutenant Colonel of the regiment, and in every position he was placed, showed himself to be a gallant and brave officer, and had much of the time been in command of the regiment. His rare and brilliant soldierly qualities were appreciated by all, but by none more than his old Company A, who all these years had been watching him, and were proud of him as a soldier and their old Captain.

When the regiment went north on veteran furlough in the spring of 1864, they stopped in St. Louis, and Company A determined to carry out their long-cherished plan of presentation to their old Captain. They

purchased an elegant saber, belt etc., and after their arrival at Rock Island, on the morning of March 25th, the company sent for Colonel Burgh to come to the Island City Hotel. Were, in an earnest and affectionate address, they presented him with their elegant testimonial. This time Colonel Burgh was at their mercy, and accepted the sword in a grace-full manor, thanking the boys in an affectionate language for their gift, and the kindly feeling that prompted them in their offering.

Mustered in September 18, 1861 as Captain of Company A, Promoted Major, August 16, 1862, Promoted Lieutenant-Colonel, December 10, 1863.

   

Decorative Saber Handle                              Jeweled Pommel

 

Decorative Scabbard Presentation

 

 

Sword Presentation to Major A. R. Mock

 

 

In March, 1865, The Citizens of Genesee, Illinois presented Major A. R. Mock with highly desirable Civil War Horstmann Presentation Grade Cavalry Officer's Saber with inscribed presentation plate on the scabbard. The saber has a Model 1840 pattern, flat-back, 34 1/2-inch, blade with acid-etched panels decorated with stands of flags, military trophies and floral sprays. The obverse ricasso is etched with the dealer's name: "W.H. HORSTMANN/&SONS/PHILADELPHIA" and stamped with a Solingen crowned head manufacturer's mark. The top of the blade is etched "IRON PROOF". The gold-plated brass, three branch guard and counter-guard have Model 1840 regulation officer's pattern cast scroll and acanthus leaf decorations. The non-regulation, flat, pommel is secured by two screws and has cast leaf decorations on the edges. The back strap has a highly detailed cast Medusa head surrounded by scrollwork. The grip is silver with twisted wire wrap. The nickel-plated scabbard has a gold-plated brass drag, suspension bands and rings and throat. The obverse side of the drag and suspension bands are decorated with simple floral and geometric engraving. A silver plate between the upper suspension band and scabbard throat is engraved with the inscription: "Presented to/MAJOR A. R. MOCK/9th ILL. CAVALRY/-By/Citizens of Geneseo Ill./March 1865,”

 

Decorative Scabbard Presentation

 

Decorative Saber Handle

 

Horstman Presentation Grade Cavalry Officer's Saber with Scabbard

 

 

General Samuel R. Curtis

This is a special CDV that was taken by Mathew Brady. I have included a copy of the glass plate.

 

 

On May 17, 1861,  He received command of the Army of the Southwest, which he led to victory over Confederate forces in March of 1862 at the Battle of Pea Ridge in Arkansas.  For his achievement, he was promoted to major general.  After receiving his promotion, Curtis moved his army further into Arkansas and captured the city of Helena in July. 

 

 

March on the city Helena AK - photos

The attachments are period images of what the 9th troopers would have seen once they arrived in Helena, AK. and after.

 

Benton Barracks, St. Louis, MO. February 21, 1862. The regiment received their first arms, a regulation saber, and Colt’s navy, and the Remington revolver for each trooper and about 100 each Hall’s carbines.

 

Helena General Hospital. Just on the back of the town on the high table land on the bluffs lying was the beautiful plantation of Confederate General Hindmans, now one of the several Hospitals established to care for the regiments sick and wounded. In early August 1862, Dr. Charles Brackett of the 9th Illinois Cavalry wrote his wife about the hospitals in Helena “. . . by the time I had finished was thoroughly used up. It was the hottest day of the season when even the acclimated citizens kept [to] the house.” The heat in the summer months spawned insects and generated dust. Contaminated water caused diarrhea. When the rains began, the dust turned to mud.

A number of men had been wounded in engagements with Confederates and partisans on the march through Arkansas. All were weak from weeks of fighting heat, thirst, insects and reptiles. Many became ill soon after they arrived in Helena. No matter the cause, their condition was made worse by the lack of proper hospital facilities.

 

A man named Curtis worked for Dr. Charles Brackett, a surgeon in the 9th Illinois Cavalry, who wrote his wife, “The old negro Curtis is putting things ‘to rights’ in the tent, sweeping in front with a few twigs tied together with string and with this he makes things look neat.”

 

Most freedom seekers wanted more than work, they wanted to better themselves, to learn to read and write—skills that had long been denied to them and that would be necessary to survive and prosper as free people. They wanted their children to attend school. One Union soldier observed that the Freedmen were, “. . . using all means to improve their condition, enquiring diligently after spelling books, etc. . . .”

 

Ox cart and grocery store Helena 1862

 

Thomas, Bankes Photo Gallery Helena 1862

 

Fort Curtis Helena 1862

 

Flat boat picket duty Helena 1864

 

Helena 1864

 

 

Last Cavalry Campaign of the Civil War

March – April 1865 – photos

 

 

Chosen by General Grant, General James H. Wilson would lead one of the largest cavalry campaigns of the Civil War.  Wilson would assemble over 13,500 troopers that would sweep through the South’s remaining primary manufacturing facilities and would be opposed unsuccessfully by a much smaller force under the command of Confederate General Nathan Bedford Forrest of about 2,500 men. 


While planning for this campaign, General Wilson assessed all of his assets and determined that each cavalryman would be armed with the formidable 7-shot Spencer repeating rifle and would be riding the best mounts.  


On March 18, 1865, General Order Number 24 was read: 
“The Major General commanding takes great pleasure in announcing to the cavalry corps, that the officers and men of the Second Iowa, Sixth and Ninth Illinois, have with a spirit of generosity, excelled only by their gallantry, voluntary turned over to the First Division a large number of Spencer carbines, taking in exchange an equal number of inferior arms of various patterns; this too, they had been compelled to turn over their horses to the Seventh Division and other detachments. Such an exhibition of zeal for the interest of the public service, of self-denial, and of friendly regard for their brothers in arms, is unparalleled, and entitles the brave men who have so cheerfully made it, to the thanks and admiration of every soldier in the corps. Troops who have distinguished themselves by so many acts of gallantry has adorned the history of the Fifth Division could have made no greater sacrifice.  They are entitled to the best remount, equipment, and arms the country can furnish and every effort will be made to secure them in time to enable them to participate in the events of the ensuing campaign. “ This order will be read to every regiment in the Fifth Division. By the Command of Brevet Major-General Wilson,  [Signed]  

                                                                         
 E. B. Beaumont                                                
Major and Assistant Adj. General


The 27 year Wilson, known as the old boy general conceived a plan to send his cavalry through Alabama and Georgia on a raid that would help to drive the final nail into the South’s cause. He believed that this raid would prove once and for all the validity and strength of the underused mounted arm of the union forces. “The horse is primary factor in the cavalry. Through him, the cavalry can move faster, gets there quicker, covers longer distance in less time, finds the weaker places in the enemy lines, strikes the flank or rear or breaks his means of communication and supply.”
And so began Wilson’s month long campaign to destroy war resources and prevent the South from staging their last stance.
The initial target of the campaign was Selma, Alabama, and Wilson struck so hard, so fast and with so many men that not even General Nathan Bedford Forrest was able to hold him back. Forrest skirmished and fought with Wilson as he pushed down through the Alabama iron country to Selma, but was unable to assemble enough men to halt the Union advance.

As he moved forward, Wilson destroyed many of the iron furnaces of Alabama. These industrial complexes had supplied the Confederacy with thousands of tons of iron for use in manufacturing cannon, artillery projectiles, cookware and more. 

Forrest turned on Wilson at what is now Stanton, 24 miles north of Selma, to fight his last battle on ground of his own choosing. The Battle of Ebenezer Church ended in a Union victory, but not before Forrest had killed 33 men who fell before the general's pistols and saber during the engagement.

Following the Battle of Selma and the destruction of the industrial complex in that city, Wilson turned east and captured the capital city of Montgomery virtually without firing a shot.

 

 

From Montgomery, Wilson continued east for Georgia. One column of his force captured West Point, Georgia, while the other fought the last major battle of the war at Columbus, Georgia.

 

 

Selma’s arsenal contained, among other things, 15 siege guns, 60,000 rounds of artillery ammunition, and 1 million rounds of small arms ammunition. Wilson destroyed the city's eleven ironworks and foundries, which had produced war goods for the Confederacy, as well as locomotives and rail cars, thus depriving the Confederacy of one of its last reliable industrial centers. 
Moreover, Forrest's cavalry would harass Wilson's forces no more. In a meeting between Forrest and Wilson, Forrest reputedly said to Wilson, "Well, General, you have beaten me badly, and for the first time I am compelled to make such an acknowledgement."
Wilson organized cavalry patrols to capture fleeing Confederate leaders and to obtain the surrender of any bands of Confederates still roaming Alabama and Georgia. On May 10, 1865, a group of Wilson's men captured the former president of the Confederacy, Jefferson Davis, at Irwinville in South Georgia. Groups of Wilson's men also captured or arrested former Confederate vice president Alexander Stephens, Georgia governor Joseph E. Brown, Georgia senator Benjamin Hill, and the infamous Henry Wirz, commandant of Andersonville prison. Wilson's forces were fully disbanded by early July.

 

 

Private Benjamin Frank Price

 

 

Benjamin was a farmer until he joined Company M. of the Ninth Illinois Cavalry, along with his older brother George A. Price. He was mustered into the regiment on August 28, 1862, and his residence was Onarga, Iroquois County, Illinois. He served for three years and participated in several skirmishes and one battle. While serving in Sturgis's division in the battle at Guntown, Mississippi on June 10, 1864, he was struck by a musket ball in the left arm. He subsequently rode to Memphis, Tennessee, a distance of 125 miles, where he had his arm amputated on June 13, 1864. He had nothing to eat during the entire journey.

 

 

Private Dwight L. Talcott, Company I

 

 

At the Battle of Campbellsville, Tenn., November 24, 1864, was taken prisoner and was sent to Andersonville. When Talcott entered the prison he weighed 147 pounds. When he was released he weighed but 75 pounds and his father, who called for him, was forced to carry him in his arms like a baby. The doctors at the prison were of the opinion that Talcott would never live until he reached his Rockton home. He was mustered out of service June 3, 1865 as a prisoner of war.

 

Roll of Honor

 

 

Private Adrian, Frederick., Company E. Died at Andersonville Prison, September 9, 1864; grave 8,2944.

Private Agarty, Jeremiah, Company K. Died at Eastport, Miss, May 16, 1865.

Private Ahr, William, Company B. Died at Gainesville, AL, September 21, 1865.

Private Albert, Mather, Company M. Died at Jacksonport, Ark, July 27, 1862.

Private Alberts, Reinhart, Company F. Died at Helena, Ark, September 25, 1862.

Corporal Albright, Delos, Company I. Died on hospital boat near St. Louis, October 1, 1862.

Private Alexander, Henry, Company M. Died at Onarga, Ill., March 8, 1862.

Private Atkins, Clinton, Company G. Died June 13, 1862.

Private Atkinson, Eli, Company I. Died at Helena, Ark, August 17, 1862.

Corporal Babcock, Merlin, Company G. Died at Memphis, Tenn., October 5, 1864.

Private Baker, Jacob, Company F. Died at Helena, Ark, September 25, 1862.

Private Bartlett, David C., Company B. Died at Helena, Ark, October 29, 1862.

Private Bear, Martin, Company E. Missing in action at Savanna, Tenn., October 17, 1864.

Private Barton, Charles, Company L. Died at Pocahontas, Mo., May 11, 1862.

Private Baxter, Alpheus, Company E. Died at Dennis, Mass., June 12, 1864.

Private Behers, John, Company F. Died at Selma, Ala, October 25, 1865.

Private Bennett, Isaac, Company K. Died at Patterson, Mo., May 11, 1862.

Private Bellows, Albert, Company H. Died at Tupelo, Miss., July 15, 1864.

Private Berry, James S., Company F. Died at St. Louis, Mo., November 3, 1862.

Private Berry, Jordan, Company E. Died at Memphis, Tenn., March 14, 1864.

Private Boden, William H., Company F. Died at Andersonville Prison, August 13, 1864; grave 5475.

Surgeon Brackett, Charles, Died at Helena, Ark, February 20, 1863.

Private Bradwell, Oliver, Company B. Died at Camp Douglass, Ill., January 15, 1862.

Private Branch, Edwin H., Company I. Died at Pontotoc, Miss, July 12, 1864.

Private Bringham, William, Company A. Died September 5, 1864 at Memphis, Tenn. From wounds received August 13th.

Private Brooks, James J., Company G. Died at Memphis, Tenn., April 25, 1864.

Private Brown, Caleb N., Company I. Died at Louisville, Ky., March 19, 1865.

Private Burmuster, Charles, Company B. Died at St. Louis, Mo., November 9, 1862.

Private Buncher, Lewis, Company A. Died June 2, 1862.

Private Burns, Barney, Company M. Died at Memphis Tenn., February 12, 1864.

Private Butcher, Isaac, Company I. Died at Cairo, Ill, March 25, 1865.

Bugler Buss, John, Company K. Died at Nashville, Tenn, January 1, 1865.

Private Carl, Sampson, Company G. Died at Helena, Ark., 1862.

Private Cameron, Edward, Company K. Died at Memphis, Tenn., March 24, 1864.

Private Cameron, Phillip, Company L. Died on hospital boat, October, 5, 1862.

Corporal Cerey, Patrick, Company F. Died at Keokuk, Iowa, November 17, 1863.

Private Chenneworth, Riley, Company M. Died at Reeve’s Station, Mo., March 23, 1862.

Private Cherry, William R., Company H. Died December 31, 1861.

Private Cole, Charles H., Company E. Died at Reeve’s station, Mo., April 14, 1862.

First Sergeant Cole, Marcellus, Company F. Died at Campbellville, Tenn., November 24, 1864.

Private Connerly, Peter, Company K. Died at Chicago, Ill., December 7, 1861.

Private Conasky, David, Company D. Died at Helena, Ark, October 1, 1862.

Private Conners, Edward, Company A. Died at St. Louis, Mo., April 1, 1864.

Private Cooley, John F., Company I. Died at Keokuk, Iowa, October 29, 1862.

Private Cooper, Enoch, Company A. Died at Keokuk, Iowa, October16, 1862.

Private Cooper, George, Company M. Killed at Oxford, Miss., August, 13, 1864.

Private Cornelius, James, Company H. Died at Andersonville Prison, August 24, 1864; grave 6738.

Private Crommett, David, Company C. Died at Anderson Prison, October 1, 1864.

Private Cunningham, Cornelius, Company G. Died August 25, 1862.

Private Curtis, George, Company I. Died at Louisville, Ky., January 10, 1865.

Private Dack, Charles H., Company H. Died at Andersonville Prison, September 18, 1864; grave 8187.

Private Daniels, William, Company M. Killed at St. Louis, Mo., March 1, 1864.

Private Danilson, Charles, Company E. Died at Memphis, Tenn., March 18, 1864.

Private Dawson, Robert A., Company L. Killed at Tupelo, Miss., July 15, 1864.

Bugler Denney, James H., Company L. Died at Hopewell, Mo., February 28, 1862, of wounds received on railroad.

Private Dillon, Patrick, Company E. Died at Germantown, Tenn., March, 10, 1864.

Sergeant Dillon, Newton, Company M. Died at Columbia, Tenn., November 24, 1864, of wounds.

Private Downing, Simon B., Company C. Died August, 30, 1864 of wounds.

Private Dunklin, Peter, Company I. Died about December 1864.

Private Elliot, Simon, Company B. Died at New Albany, Ind., January 6, 1865.

Sergeant Major Ellis, John C., Died August 18, 1865.

Private Englehaupt, David R. P., Company B. Died at Eastport, Miss., June 12, 1865.

Sergeant Ewing, David A., Company E. Died at Germantown, Tenn., May 12, 1863.

Private Fairchild, Squire, Company G. Died at Helena, Ark., 1862.

Private Fannen, Henry, Company M. Died at Gainesville, Ala., October 24, 1865.

Private Faunce, Thomas, Company B. Died at Cahaba Prison, Ala., June 13, 1865.

Private Fiddler, Conrad, Company G. Died at Eastport, Miss., May 22, 1865, of wounds.

Private Fogerty, Cornellus, Company I. Died at Keokuk, Iowa, November 17, 1862.

Sergeant Follett, John, Company M. Died at Reeve’s Station, Mo., March 30, 1862.

Private Fones, James, Company B. Killed at Savannah, Tenn., October 14, 1864.

Corporal Foster, Erastus S., Company K. Died at Andersonville Prison, January 17, 1865; grave 12473.

Private Fries, Daniel, Company B. Died at Iuka, Miss., July 15, 1865.

Private Frisby, Alonzo, Company M. Died at Andersonville Prison, February 8, 1864.

Private Goodall, John, Company D. Died at Helena, Ark., July 19, 1862.

Private Gray, William, Company I. Died at Eastport, Miss., February 10, 1865.

Corporal Griswold, Francis, Company K. Died at Memphis, Tenn., July 21, 1862.

Private Haggart, Ansel, Company G. Died at St. Louis, Mo., October 5, 1862.

Private Hanrahan, Patrick, Company L. Died at Montgomery, Ala., August 27, 1865.

Private Hamilton, Jacob, Company F. Died at Memphis, Tenn., June 14, 1864.

Private Hamilton, John, Company F. Died at Helena, Ark., November 26, 1862.

Private Hayes, Michael, Company B. Died at Nashville, Tenn., December 6, 1864.

Private Hendee, George W., Company G. Died of wounds about April 23, 1863.

First Sergeant Henderson, Robert H., Company H. Died at Campbellville, Tenn., November 24, 1864.

Private Hessey, Horatio, Company I. Killed at Campbellville, Tenn., November 24, 1864.

Private Hicks, Hiram, Company F. Died at St. Louis, Mo., October 20, 1862.

Private Hill, J. H., Company F. Died at Andersonville Prison, August 11, 1864; grave 4489.

Private, Hoover, Julius, Company M. Died at Iuka, Miss., July 14, 1865.

Private Horan, Kerran, Company B. Died at Demopolis, Ala., December 16, 1865.

Private Hover, Francis, Company B. Died at Camp Douglass, Ill., December 16, 1861.

Private Houghtaling, John A., Company F. Died at Montgomery, Ala., August 14, 1865.

Private House, Samuel, Company I. Died at Eastport, Miss., May 29, 1865.

Private Howard, Alonzo, Company A. Died at Nashville, Tenn., December 18, 1864.

Private Howard, Patrick, Company B. Died at Cahaba Prison, Ala., March 28, 1864.

Private, Ingleking, Conrad, Company D. Died April 19, 1862.

Private, Ireland, Henry, Company B. Died at Salem, Miss., October 8, 1863.

Private, Jackson, Mathew, Company H. Died at Helena, Ark., September 23, 1862.

Private, Jacobs, John G., Company B. Died at Helena, Ark., August 4, 1862.

Private, Jacobs, Oliver, Company B. Died at Helena, Ark., August 23, 1862.

King, James, Company B. Died at Memphis, Tenn.

Private, Jenkins, E. J., Company B. Died at Cotton Plant, Ark., May 17, 1862.

Corporal, Jergens, Christian, Company F. Killed in Mississippi, February 25, 1864.

Private, Johnson, Lucian, Company C. Died at Helena, Ark., August 29, 1862.

Private, Jones, Homer, Company G. Died at Reeve’s Station, Mo., April, 22, 1862.

Private, Katze, Henry, Company D. Died at Memphis, Tenn., October 20, 1864.

Private, Killian, Francis, Company F. Died at Demopolis, Ala., October 27, 1865.

Private, Knaggs, William, Company H. Died at Pilot Knob, Mo., April 8, 1862.

Private, Koethe, William, Company L. Died at Mount City, Mo., May 17, 1865.

Private, Kreizaz, Jacob, Company B. Died at Gainesville, Ala., August 25, 1865.

Sergeant, Lane, Alonzo P., Company L. Killed at Franklin, Tenn., November 30, 1864.

Sergeant, Laramore, William, Company E. Died at Andersonville Prison, August 16, 1864; grave 5906.

Private, Latson, William F., Company I. Died at Camp Douglas, Ill., February 24, 1862.

Private, Lennie, William, Company C. Died at St. Louis, Mo., December 17, 1862.

Private, Lewis, Henry, Company H. Died at Charleston, S. C. in prison.

Private, Louks, David, Company G. Died at Helena, Ark., September 29, 1862.

Commissary Sergeant, Ludden, Chancey F., Company I. died December 22, 1864 of wounds.

Private, Mackey, Benjamin, Company D. Died February 16, 1863.

Corporal, Maher, Dennis, Company D. Drown at Cairo, Ill., March 22, 1864.

Private, Maloy, Stephen, Company I. Died at Campbellville, Tenn., November 24, 1864.

Private, Mandville, Henry, Company H. Died at Helena, Ark., August 1, 1862.

First Sergeant, Maples, Alex, Company C. Died at Memphis, Tenn., September 3, 1864, of wounds.

Private, Marshall, Michael, Company F. Died near Clarendon, Ark., July 12, 1862.

Corporal Martin, Jefferson, Company K. Died at Andersonville Prison, July 27, 1864, grave 4.071.

Private, Marver, Alexander, Company I. Died at Nashville, Tenn., January 29, 1865.

Sergeant Matsel, Thomas, Company C. Killed at Campbellville, Tenn., November 24, 1864.

Private, Maxwell, William R., Company F. Died at Paducah, Ky., March 9, 1865.

Private, McBride, James, Company D. Died at Helena, Ark., October 13, 1862.

Private, McDade, Alfred, Company I. Died about July 1, 1864, in a rebel prison at Okolona, Miss.

First Lieutenant, McMahon, John H., Company D. Killed at Tupelo, Miss., July 16, 1864.

Private, Mendel, Lucien, Company M. Died at St. Louis, Mo., October 13, 1864.

Private, Metsel, John, Company B. Died at Memphis, Tenn., October 22, 1864.

Corporal, Meyer, Herman H., Company F. Died at Helena, Ark., October 1, 1862.

Private, Middaugh, Orlando, Company C. Died at Keokuk, Iowa, October 13, 1862.

Private, Miner, George, Company I. Died at Jeffersonville, Ind., April 5, 1865.

Private, Monroe, David B., Company I. Died at St. Louis, Mo., April 25, 1865.

Private, Montague, Cyrus, Company A. Died at Iuka, Miss., June 15, 1865.

Private, Mooney, Robert L, Company L. Died at Montevailo, Ala., September 19, 1865.

Private, Mordoff, Frank M., Company I. Died at Cairo, Ill., October 20, 1862.

Private, Morey, Moses D, Company L. Died at Helena, Ark., April 23, 1863.

Private, Morrow Alexander, Company B. Died at St. Louis, Mo., 1862.

Private, Morrow, Walter, Company B. Died at Keokuk, Iowa, October 23, 1862.

Private, Morris, Newel, Company I. Died at St. Louis, Mo., October 26, 1865.

Sergeant, Morris, Thomas, Company B. Died at Camp Douglas, Ill., January 2, 1862.

Lieutenant, Morrison, Thomas E., Company E. Died at Helena, Ark., August 22, 1862.

Private, Murry, Patrick, Company B. Died at Iuka, Miss., June 7, 1865.

Private, Myers, Peter, Company D. Died at Eastport, Miss., June 12, 1865.

Private, Myre, Joseph E., Company E. Died at Helena, Ark., August 16, 1862.

Captain, Neimeyer, Fred C., Company F. Died at Tuscaloosa, Ala., September 21, 1865.

Private, Netzel, John T., Company D. Died at Memphis, Tenn., October 26, 1864.

Private, Newberry, Leonidus, Company E. Died at Eastport, Miss., April 19, 1865.

Private, Olmstead, Alonzo, Company B. Died at Iuka, Mo., June 7, 1865.

Private, Olmstead, William B., Company K. Died at St. Louis, Mo., November 3, 1862.

Private, O’Mira, Daniel J., Company E. Died at Andersonville Prison, October 3, 1864; grave 10279.

Private, Osborn, Daniel J. W., Company H. Died at Andersonville Prison, October 7, 1864; grave 10,469.

Private, Ott, Daniel, Company F. Died at Campbellville, Tenn., November 24, 1864.

Private, Ott, David, Company F. Died at St. Louis, Mo., November 26, 1862.

Sergeant, Paddock, Charles B., Company K. Captured at Guntown, Miss. June 10, 1864, died in the hands of the enemy.

Lieutenant-Colonel Paddock, Sol. A., Died February 18, 1862.

Private, Perry, James, Company G. Died at Andersonville Prison, September 20, 1864; grave 9,313.

Sergeant, Peter, Robert, Company I. Died at Campbellville, Tenn., November 24, 1865.

Private, Pierson, Swanson, Company H. Died at Cahaba Prison, Ala., April 15, 1865.

Private, Pringle, Philander, Company G. Died at Village Creek, Ark., May 21, 1862.

Private, Proud, Aster, Company G. Died at Helena, Ark., November 2, 1862.

Quartermaster, Price, Samuel H., Died April 8, 1863. Sergeant, Pugh, William, Company A. Died at Nashville, Tenn., November 13, 1864.

Private, Putnam, David, Company M. Died at Memphis, Tenn., April 10, 1864.

Private, Quinn, Thomas, Company E. Died at Logansport, Ind., October 11, 1864.

Private, Race, James, Company E. Died March 28, 1865.

Private, Raymond, Andrew, Company I. Died at Belvidere, Ill., April 24, 1864.

Private, Renshaw, Felix, Company B. Died at Helena, Ark., September 15, 1862.

Private, Riley, Anthony E., Company L. Died at Guntown Miss., June 10, 1862.

Private, Rieneke, Clemens, Company F. Died at Patterson, Mo., May 17, 1862.

Private, Robb, Andrew, Company A. Died at Paducah, Ky., May 1, 1865.

Private, Roth, Joseph, Company F. Died at Hurricane Creek, Miss., August 13, 1863.

Private, Robinson, Frederick, Company I. Died at Helena, Ark., September 24, 1862.

Private, Robertson, John, Company L. Killed near Fish Creek, Miss., July 11, 1864.

Sergeant, Robertson, Nelson, Company L. Drown in Black River, Ark., June 22, 1862.

Private, Rogers, Isaac, Company L. Died at Augusta, Ark., August 6, 1862.

Private, Sand, Phillip, Company F. Died at Eastport, Miss., June 20, 1865.

Private, Schlothauer, Christopher, Company F. Died at Germantown, Tenn., July 6, 1863.

Private, Scoville, Franklin W., Company C. Died at Pilot Knob, Mo., March 13, 1862.

Private, Schafer, Frank, Company I. Died at Memphis, Tenn., August 1, 1864.

Private, Sellers, Andrew J., Company M. Drown at Black River, Ark., June 1, 1862.

Private, Sellers, Willey M., Company K. Died at Eastport, Miss., April 5, 1865.

Private, Selvey, William, Company M. Died at Little Black, Mo., May 2, 1862.

Private, Shaeffer, Christoff, Company D. Killed August 21, 1864.

Private, Skeels, William N., Company M. Died at Nashville, Tenn., December 24, 1864.

Private, Sleek, Philip, Company E. Died at Andersonville Prison, October 11, 1864; grave 10,663.

Private, Slick, Phillip, Died at Andersonville Prison, October 11, 1864; grave 10663.

Sergeant, Smith, Asa, Company H. Killed at Tupelo, Miss., July 15, 1864.

Private, Smith, Byron, Company G. Died at Pontotoc, Miss., July 18, 1864, from wounds.

Corporal, Smith, Geo., Company F. Died at Cairo, Ill., October 1, 1862.

Saddler, Smith, Henry, Company F. Died at Eastport, Miss., February 28, 1865.

Private, Smith, John W., Company D. Died at Helena, Ark., October 11, 1862.

Private, Smith, Noah, Company A. Died at White’s Station Tenn., September 30, 1864.

Private, Stebbins, William, Company I. Died at Memphis, Tenn.

Private, Stephens, Franklin, Company H. Died at Gallatin, Tenn., February 9, 1864.

Private, Stephens, George, Company K. Died at Mount City, Mo., May 7, 1865.

Private, Storm, Sylvester, Company I. Died at Reeve’s Station, Mo., April 12, 1862.

Private, Strang, Whitney, Company K. Died at Patterson, Mo., April 9, 1862.

Private, Strong, Thomas, Company I. Died at Gravelly Springs, Miss., February 5, 1865.

Saddler, Strums, Lewis G., Company C. Died at Reeve’s Station, Mo., March 25, 1862.

Private, Sutee, Benjamin, Company I. Died at Andersonville Prison, November 4, 1864; grave 11808.

Private, Sutton, Martin, Company M. Died at Andersonville Prison, August 13, 1864; grave 5515.

Private, Tapley, John, Company F. Died at Tuscaloosa, Ala., September 7, 1865.

Private, Tayler, Harmon, Company E. Died at Andersonville Prison, September 29, 1864; grave 10036.

Sergeant, Teas, William J., Company F. Died at Campbellville, Tenn., November 24, 1864.

Private, Teeters, Benjamin, Died at Helena, Ark., December 20, 1862.

Sergeant, Thomas, Chancey, Company F. Died at Helena, Ark., September 26, 1862.

Private, Thompson, William B., Company B. Died at Nashville, Tenn., December 26, 1864.

Sergeant, Tolbert, George W., Company M. Died at Reeve’s Station, Mo., March 30, 1862.

Corporal, Tompkins, Andrew, Company G. Died at Eastport, Miss., May 10, 1865.

Private, Turner, Orson A., Company I. Died at Nashville, Tenn., December 25, 1864.

Sergeant, Thayer, Lester, Company M. Died at Memphis, Tenn., October 1, 1862.

Private, Van Wess, George J., Company M. Died at Keokuk, Iowa, October 8, 1862.

Private, Van Valkenburg, W., Company G. Died at Jacksonport, Ark., December 24, 1864.

Private, Vetter, Robert, Company C. Died March 12, 1865.

Private, Vite, Barnett, Company M. Died Helena, Ark., September 12, 1862.

Corporal, Waldo, Judson M., Company K. Died at Andersonville Prison, October 12, 1864; grave 10756.

Private, Walsh, John, Company I. Died at Helena, Ark., September 21, 1862.

Private, Watkins, William N., Company L. Died at Cairo, Ill., October 21, 1862.

Private, Weakman, Fred, Company B. Died at Jefferson Barracks, Mo., June 8, 1865.

Private, Wehargen, Joseph, Company B. Died October 21, 186 of wounds received at Salem, October 8.

Lieutenant, Westbrook, Abner, Company I. Died at Memphis, Tenn., October 22, 1864.

Private, West, Joseph C., Company K. Died at St. Louis, Mo., November 15, 1862.

Private, Wheeler, W. F., Company B. Died at Montgomery, Ala., August 21, 1865.

Private, Whipp, Charles, Company E. Died at Andersonville Prison, September 4, 1864; grave 8713.

Corporal, Wiesner, John W., Company D. Died at Germantown, Tenn., June 4, 1863.

Private, Wilbanks, Randolph, Company B. Died at Helena, Ark., September 19, 1862.

Private, Williams, Alfred, Company E. Died at Germantown, Tenn., September 4, 1863.

Private, Wilson, Asa W., Company M. Died near Jacksonport, Ark., June 26, 1862.

Private, Wilson, Robert, Company A. Killed at Guntown, Miss, June 10, 1864.

Private, Wollensack, Charles E., Company F. Died at Helena, Ark., July 15, 1862.

Private, Wood, James W., Company A. Died at Huntsville, Ala, July, 1865.

Private, York, Joseph, Company C. Died at Helena, Ark., September 4, 1862.

Private, Zerbe, Peter, Company E. Died at Helena, Ark., September 4, 1862, of wounds.

Private, Zerrick, Clement, Company F. Died at Patterson, Mo., May 17, 1862.

Unassigned Recruits

Private Lyon, John, Died at Camp Butler, Ill, April 11, 1864.

Private Mower, John R., Died at Camp Butler, Ill, April 27, 1864.

Private Thompson, James W., Died at Camp Butler, Ill, December 21, 1864.

 

 

Died at Andersonville Prison

 

 

Private Adrian, Frederick., Company E. Died at Andersonville Prison, September 9, 1864; grave 8,2944.

Private Boden, William H., Company F. Died at Andersonville Prison, August 13, 1864; grave 5475.

Private Cornelius, James, Company H. Died at Andersonville Prison, August 24, 1864; grave 6738.

Private Dack, Charles H., Company H. Died at Andersonville Prison, September 18, 1864; grave 8187.

Corporal Foster, Erastus S., Company K. Died at Andersonville Prison, January 17, 1865; grave 12473.

Private Frisby, Alonzo, Company M. Died at Andersonville Prison, February 8, 1864.

Private Hill, J. H., Company F. Died at Andersonville Prison, August 11, 1864; grave 4489.

Sergeant, Laramore, William, Company E. Died at Andersonville Prison, August 16, 1864; grave 5906.

Corporal Martin, Jefferson, Company K. Died at Andersonville Prison, July 27, 1864, grave 4.071.

Private, O’Mira, Daniel J., Company E. Died at Andersonville Prison, October 3, 1864; grave 10279.

Private, Osborn, Daniel J. W., Company H. Died at Andersonville Prison, October 7, 1864; grave 10,469.

Private, Perry, James, Company G. Died at Andersonville Prison, September 20, 1864; grave 9,313.

Private, Sleek, Philip, Company E. Died at Andersonville Prison, October 11, 1864; grave 10,663.

Private, Slick, Phillip, Died at Andersonville Prison, October 11, 1864; grave 10663.

Private, Sutee, Benjamin, Company I. Died at Andersonville Prison, November 4, 1864; grave 11808.

Private, Sutton, Martin, Company M. Died at Andersonville Prison, August 13, 1864; grave 5515.

Private, Tayler, Harmon, Company E. Died at Andersonville Prison, September 29, 1864; grave 10036.

Corporal, Waldo, Judson M., Company K. Died at Andersonville Prison, October 12, 1864; grave 10756.

Private, Whipp, Charles, Company E. Died at Andersonville Prison, September 4, 1864; grave 8713.
 

 

Died at Cahaba Prison

 

 

Private Howard, Patrick, Company B. Died at Cahaba Prison, Ala., March 28, 1864.

Private, Pierson, Swanson, Company H. Died at Cahaba Prison, Ala., April 15, 1865.

 

 

Died at other Prisons

 

Castle Pinckney

 

Private, Lewis, Henry, Company H. Died at Charleston, S. C. in prison.

Private, McDade, Alfred, Company I. Died about July 1, 1864, in a rebel prison at Okolona, Miss.

 

 

Andersonville Prison

 

 

Andersonville Prison (also known as Camp Sumter) was one of the largest confederate prison camps during the Civil War. Over the course of 14 months, 45,000 Union soldiers passed through the prison and nearly 13,000 of them died from conditions like diarrhea, dysentery and starvation. When Harper’s Weekly published photos of prisoners after the war, Americans were shocked to see the POWs reduced to skin and bones.

The 16-acre prison opened in Andersonville, GA, in February of 1864, intended to hold 10,000 prisoners. By June, the population had ballooned to twice that size. “Place so full can Scarcely Walk,” wrote one miserable prisoner. Confederates hastily built an extra ten acres, but the prison was still overcrowded and low on resources. Food was especially scarce; a typical daily meal for the prisoners was a slice of cornbread and a paltry piece of pork and the food was often rotten. “This is no other than a place of Starvation – a disgrace to any Government,” the same prisoner wrote.

Many POW’s lacked basic shelter and clothing to protect them from the elements. “A good many tore up their underclothes, drawers, &c., and

sewed them together and managed to make a little shelter,” recounted a prisoner. Despite rampant conditions like scurvy and gangrene, medical supplies were in short supply. “Many undressed wounds were fly-blown and swarming in maggots,” wrote an imprisoned Union captain.

Prisoners didn’t just die from disease, they were also killed if they crossed “the deadline,” a line of wooden posts that stood about 19 feet from the stockades. Prisoners who ventured beyond this line were liable to be shot by guards. Some men desperate to end their misery, intentionally stepped over the line.

After the war, Captain Henry Wirz, the commandant at Andersonville Prison, was found guilty of “conspiring to impair and injure the health and destroy the lives of federal prisoners” and “murder in violation of the laws of war.” Many prisoners testified against him, though some supporters argued that he was a scapegoat who was merely following orders. Either way, he was hanged at Capitol prison on November 10, 1865.

 

 

Remembering the backbone of the Civil War

 

 

Without them, the canvas of the war would have been painted very differently. From 1861-1865, there would be over one and one half million horses and mules of the Union and Confederate Armies would be killed, wounded or die from disease. For every soldier killed during the Civil War, almost five horses met a similar fate. 
One cannot overstate the importance of both horses and mules during the Civil War. The cavalry on both sides rode them. The material and supplies that each side depended upon was hauled by them. The artillery pieces and heavy guns could not have been moved from battle to battle, or maneuvered during battle, without them. They carried Generals and other high ranking officers into battle, and they transported the wounded soldiers away from the battle-field to hospitals behind the lines.
An order from Major General William T. Sherman to his troops in 1864 shows the value of the horse to the Army: “Every opportunity at a halt during a march should be taken advantage of to gut grass, wheat, or oats and extraordinary care be taken of the horses upon everything depends.”
Let us never forget their courage, loyalty and sacrifice that they gave to all.